September 2019

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30          

« Opacity and its consequences | Main | Roubini teevee »

Dec 20, 2007

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

RB

Good Luck in managing this particular resource scarcity.

I'm impressed that a politician is taking this on.

Kim

I've been trying to convince my parents to move down here, but I'm concerned about the water situation. I don't want them to move down here and then have to move back because there is no water! :-o

Ed Cone

There's lots of water.

It's stuck behind a dam in Randleman, waiting for us to build pumps and pipes to get it here...

Doug H

Isn't the city of High Point gumming up the works somehow, like by not signing an agreement or something?

I understand their water supply isn't as tenuous as GSO's.

Will

Noticed yesterday another neighbor putting the finishing touches on a brand new well in their yard presumably for drip irrigating their lawn. They were installing the mature shrubbery to hide the gray plastic boulder covering the pump mechanism. Now I'm all for property rights and whatever category "plundering precious resources" falls under but good Lord I really had to wonder how a person could in good conscience drill a well today. I mean, its one big dwindling aquaphor (sp?), right? Its certainly telling of people I thought I knew. And you know darn well there are more than a few "sprinkler malfunctions" happening around 3AM. I abhor government meddling, big or small, but could we not consider a moratorium on well drilling similar to the moratorium sometimes placed on water meters "hook ups" imposed on developers? Maybe its not the wells, maybe stiffer fines?

Bubba

I believe HP has finally signed off.

However, the Wheels of Bureaucracy don't spin too quickly in matters like this.

Remind me again: What year was it that this project got started?

Joe Killian

High Point signed on a few months ago.

http://www.news-record.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071017/NRSTAFF/71016018/0/NEWS1604

The Raleigh Chronicle

Ed, the Governor also recently called a water conservation conference as we reported on December 13th (see our story similar to the one you linked to that appeared later in the N&O).
http://www.raleigh2.com/link.asp?smenu=1&sdetail=237&wpage=1

Unfortunately, I think the state should have been having this type of water conference a long time ago before cities started having to count their water supply in terms of days, not months.

Billy The Blogging Poet

Will said, "Noticed yesterday another neighbor putting the finishing touches on a brand new well in their yard presumably for drip irrigating their lawn. They were installing the mature shrubbery to hide the gray plastic boulder covering the pump mechanism. Now I'm all for property rights and whatever category "plundering precious resources" falls under but good Lord I really had to wonder how a person could in good conscience drill a well today. I mean, its one big dwindling aquaphor (sp?), right? Its certainly telling of people I thought I knew. And you know darn well there are more than a few "sprinkler malfunctions" happening around 3AM. I abhor government meddling, big or small, but could we not consider a moratorium on well drilling similar to the moratorium sometimes placed on water meters "hook ups" imposed on developers? Maybe its not the wells, maybe stiffer fines?"

All of these issues could be addressed if out so called "leaders" had balls enough to address them.

For starters: Ground water (the water in a well) comes under Federal and State mining laws and can be regulated at the drop of a hat just like any other precious mineral. Greensboro and every other city has the right to use all the water under its own city limits.

Secondly, if anyone from the City, the media or the local Blogosphere would like to join me in some simple demonstrations I can show you how the City of Greensboro can save millions of gallons each month at the cost of a few pennies per building. Almost every public building in Greensboro be they privately owned or government owned is throwing away thousands of gallons of water each day for no reason whatsoever.

The City of Greensboro (and most cities) are failing to practice what they preach.

Ludacris

Billy, although I agree with you on the issue of conserving water and that basically all fresh water (whether it comes from a well connected to an aquifer or city lake) is basically part of the same loop, I disagree with you on a couple of points.

You said "Greensboro and every other city has the right to use all the water under its own city limits."

You are correct that if the City of Greensboro decided they wanted to sink some wells (on their own city-owned properties) and use the water for city purposes, they can certainly do that. However, they do not own the water underneath my property just because it is in the city limits.

In North Carolina and other eastern states, there is no legal precedent for the City of Greensboro owning all of the water beneath my home or any other private landowner's home within the city limits.

This is in contrast to California and other western states where groundwater has been a limited resource used by citizens, various industries and cities since it was first settled. Out west, there are certainly different practices and established case law based on historical water appropriation where you could not even own the water on your own property, but not in NC.

In addition, there is no reference that I can find to regulation of water in the federal mining laws and an extension of mining acts meant to regulate precious metals or mining of coal is not applicable.

Certainly federal jurisdiction is relevant in regards to navigable waterways, which are a different matter than groundwater. In addition, pollution of any water supply is controlled by the Clean Water Act and the EPA with large fines for even the smallest of violations, but it doesn't cover usage.

Also, I think a proposed moratorium on sinking new wells in the area ignores the fact that there are many places in Guilford County (and probably the entire state) where city water is not accessible.

In addition, I have always been upset that city water forces me and my family to use flouridated water. To me, the use of a well on private land just to irrigate your lawn for aesthetic purposes is not a good use of water to say the least. To sink a well to get drinking water is another matter altogether.

I do agree that Guilford County and Greensboro officials have done a poor job in regulating growth to keep it within the boundaries that are infrastructure can tolerate, whether it be schools, roads, or water. Why the city and county continues to approve massive new developments near water supplies while asking current citizens to conserve water baffles me and the proposed golf course community out by the Haw River State Park is a perfect example.

The comments to this entry are closed.