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« The failed failure narrative and the Tillis trap | Main | Local costs of Raleigh's Medicaid roadblock »

Apr 19, 2014

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Bill Bush

The positive stories on FB re: Obamacare Success Stories alone provide the raw material for a strong assertion of the effectiveness of ACA. She could beat up on the unpopular McCrony and Tillis or whoever quite effectively. The best defense for her will be a strong offense.

Lex

Fate and politics have handed Hagan a very big stick with which to clout her eventual opponent, although she and/or allied funding sources could do much worse than to start clouting ALL the GOP candidates NOW, and in a very big way.

Hagan's pussyfooting with the ACA at this point reminds me of the guy on the rooftop during a flood. Guy in a rowboat comes by, offers him a lift. Our guy says, "No, God will preserve me." Coast Guard helicopter appears, asks if he needs evacuation. He waves it off, saying, "No, God will preserve me." The waters keep rising, and he drowns. Once in Heaven, he asks God, "I put my faith in you. Why didn't you preserve me?" God facepalms, then he headdesks, and then he looks at our guy and says, wearily, "Dude. I sent a boat. I sent a helicopter...."

John

That's an interesting political strategy. Kind of like The Charge Of The Light Brigade

Andrew Brod

"In this environment, it seems to me, the most sensible approach for Obama and Democrats is to defend the Affordable Care Act aggressively—as they are increasingly doing."

NitWitCharmer

Yes, Doc..

Statism does appears to have the advantage of "stickiness". Implement the program and it will remain. It's a one way dynamic that results in small-citizen/big-government Frenchy despair.

On the other hand in regard to the ACA, what is to say that of the ACA were repealed that those who have received insurance via the ACA will be thrown off their insurance? These are after all plans via private insurance.

I suppose what I am suggesting is that the repeal of the ACA would not require people lose their health insurance in the way that the implementation of the ACA has.

If that is the case, and it is, that hurtle to ACA repeal that is presented above does not truly exist.

It depends on the Republican plan, though. Will it be progressive or will it be American? Will it be a smart repeal or will it be a conservative/progressive "fix"?

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