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« Gauger's disaster | Main | Culture of transparency »

May 09, 2012

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Bill Bush

Obviously some people were too busy to vote:

http://newsfeed.time.com/2012/05/09/and-the-smuttiest-city-in-america-is/

justcorbly

I grew up in the '50's and '60's in Ohio with people who vigorously cited Biblical justifications for Jim Crow, segregation, and their support for continued oppression of millions of Americans. Preachers preached it and politicians exploited it.

That, of course, allowed them to counter any disagreement as an attack on their faith. Obviously, it wasn't. But, faith has always been perverted by groups seeking to maintain their positions of power: God made Africans to be slaves. God made Arab women to be subservient, yet threatening. God made gays to be unworthy of the rights God gave to everyone else. All cut from the same cloth, for the same purpose.

North Carolinians who oppose this amendment need to commit themselves to the long game. Demographics are on the side of justice. In the meantime, we need to continue to oppose those who believe their faith gives them the right to tell other people how to live their lives.

Dr. Mary Johnson

Until a hypocritical POS plied his trade in Asheboro, I stayed out of this dogfight. Ultimately, I did not vote (addressed at Housecalls - won't belabor those points here - but suffice it to say, Dr. Mary is well-versed in being denied even basic civil rights in North Carolina - and nobody giving a tinker's damn).

Corbly, this needs to be said - by somebody. I did not care for a lot of the rhetoric and scare tactics used by the "against" forces. Critical tactical errors were made early on.

In terms of changing hearts and minds (which is what MUST happen to affect REAL change/acceptance), maybe the commercials focusing on the legally-theoretical horrible things that might happen to straight people wasn't the way to go.

You are absolutely right about demographics (and time) being on the side of civil unions (which PLEASE BE CLEAR, I do not oppose). Sooner or later this will be an issue for the US Supremes. It IS a long-haul fight for the gay community - it's not gonna be easy. Most things that are worthwhile, aren't.

But I really don’t think that attacking religion/what people genuinely believe about what the word "marriage" means (based on what the Bible DOES say) . . . or calling them bigots/homophobes/racists/crazy/what-the-hell-ever-else . . . on the premise that you're smarter, or more enlightened or exceptionally aware or somehow just better-in-every-way . . . EVER works to do anything except motivate the other side to move in (oftentimes silently) and come down HARD.

And they did. But I was genuinely surprised by the outcome – and the margin.

In taking the "us" vs. "them" train, your tactics alienated those who you most needed to covert/mobilize - those of us in the middle (for whatever reasons) - and derailed your cause. Some of the comments I read on these boards were stomach-churning in their arrogance and disrespect.

Perhaps showing some actual tolerance for the faith of others - for what they believe about what God says - might get you further in the long run.

Ironies abound in this. Church leaders pontificating on the sanctity of marriage – given the abundance of unmarried baby-mamas and baby daddies adorning their pews – had me scratching my head.

Proceed with the pile-on. I'm used to it. Won't be back to this thread anyway.

prell

"Proceed with the pile-on. I'm used to it. Won't be back to this thread anyway."

No. Please. Come back.

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