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« That Nobel and $3.50 will get you a cup of coffee | Main | Working for Mr. Zuckerberg »

Sep 27, 2011

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polifrog

And NIMBYs fasten their seat belts as other push the car from the ditch.

Ed Cone

There's a difference between NIMBY and "not until/unless you explain exactly what it is you'll be doing in my back yard and what the likely consequences of that will be."

And since natural gas currently is burned as an uneconomical byproduct, NC would seem to have the time to figure those things out.

RBM

Most everybody can 'figure those things out' in a worst case scenario of 'better late than never'. The best case is to press the industry for data and to then press all the other entities in the chain.

This is a progressing situation. Some jurisdictions are more actively addressing fracking consequences than others. For a good primer on jurisdictional efforts, read up on the Texas Railroad Commission. I understand it has a comprehensive website.

David Boyd

They flare it because there's no economical way for them to transport natural gas. Which is even more of an argument for why to move toward a natural gas economy - the stuff is so cheap that we burn it indiscriminately.

Want some infrastructure investment? This would do far, far more than rebuilding bridges. Figure how to build a well that doesn't leak (This is beyond our capability? We may have just discovered that light is not the fastest thing in the universe and we can't build a concrete casing to contain methane?) and have the government mandate that that is the minimum standard. Then set up a fund to take care of anyone whose well is contaminated.

The commercialization of the Internet in the 90s was what juiced the economy in that decade. An energy policy with natural gas at its core would do the same thing now.

Ed Cone

DB, I agree -- my point about NC is that with gas so cheap, we're in no great hurry to get ours out of the ground, and so we have time to do it right. That means better wells, better policies, etc.

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