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« Dressing down | Main | Gay Old Party »

Apr 17, 2009

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RBM
radiologists from Rochester told him the plan would raise their Internet costs enough to put them out of business...

errr How does that work ?

Joe Killian

I assume they meant that their business needed high speed broadband but the increased cost of caps plus overages would make it impossible for them to do business as a small radiology practice.

This would have been before they capped the overages, as well.

RBM

@ Joe

Thanks for the general that I had already guessed.

What I don't know is how does a radiologist use broadband. Are they transferring massive quantities of high resolution of their 'pic's online ?

For example, when I had my colonoscopy they gave me a CD with all the pics that the Doc did. I don't know if that's a apples to apples
comparison or not.

Where's a doctor when you really need one, eh ?

Leatherwing

I appreciate all the talk going on in Greensboro about this issue. With one exception (W-S Journal reporter Tim Clodfelter) it seems that W-S thinks it is immune. I've written every city council person and the mayor - not one has responded. I suppose they expect Greensboro to carry the water for them.

Ed Cone

Medical imaging and records are a fast-growing element of net traffic. As I mentioned in last week's column, the ability to access these records is a consumer issue, too.

RBM

@ Ed

I'm trying to get beyond assumptions and nail down specifics to this case.

Are the radiologists actually using the net for

Medical imaging and records
and their claim can be accepted at face value ?

Ed Cone

RBM, I cannot speak to the specific claims or usage of these docs.

Seems to me, though, that the larger issue of broadband consumption for medical purposes is relevant to the question of tiered plans.

"Delivering radiological scans via broadband requires fat pipes and rapid speeds, but the benefit to patients, insurers and doctors would be many: fewer scans, faster delivery of images where they are needed, and lower costs associated with the process."

RBM

@ Ed

No argument from me regarding the larger issue.

Joe Killian

Senator Hagan has weighed in with a written statement. Story on News-Record.com now, but I can't seem to post a link here for some reason.

Sue

Why are the radiologists using residential Internet pricing? The caps do not apply to Business Class pricing. The use of online transfer of images for diagnosis and consultation is fine; protected Internet transfer within an office is fine. But they're paying for residential service? (I'll bet "not for long.")

cheripickr

"I'm trying to get beyond assumptions and nail down specifics to this case.

Are the radiologists actually using the net for

Medical imaging and records
and their claim can be accepted at face value ?"

RBM, I don't know if this addresses your question on the level you are asking it, and you may already know more than I, but I can tell you that essentially all radiologic imaging is now computerized, and view boxes and x-ray films are rapidly becoming extinct. How much of that involves the internet I'm not sure, but there is an extensive Moses Cone intRAnet required, and I don't know if that is the same thing or similarly depends on TWC broadband. Any IT person or radiologist could tell you what you want to know but that is as close as I can come.

RBM

@ CP

Thanks for the attempted help.

I know there's a drive to digitize in general, wondered if that applied in this case or was it just a politically connected entity looking out for it own vested interest.

In this case the entity's interests seem to align with it's customer's interests, which I'd like to see more of.

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